• Guzman, Jaime

    Titles

    Investigator, BC Children's Hospital
    Staff Rheumatologist at BC Children’s Hospital
    Clinical Associate Professor, Division of Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia

    Degrees / Designations

    MD, MSc, FRCPC

    Primary Area of Research
    Childhood Diseases
    Secondary Area(s) of Research
    Phone
    604-875-2437
    Fax
    604-875-3141
    Lab Phone
    Assistant
    Angelyne Sarmiento
    Assistant Phone
    604-875-5091
    Mailing Address

    BC Children's Hospital
    Room K4-122
    4480 Oak Street
    Vancouver, BC V6H 3N1

    Affiliate Websites
    Research Areas

    Clinical epidemiology of childhood rheumatic diseases.

    Summary

    Clinical Epidemiology is a “basic science for clinical medicine”, it is the scientific process of learning from groups of patients to develop better ways to prevent, diagnose, treat and monitor diseases.  Dr. Guzman applies clinical epidemiology methods to childhood rheumatic diseases in collaboration with other researchers and clinicians.  He advises on the design, planning, analysis and interpretation of clinical studies.

    Dr. Guzman is a physician who cares regularly for children with rheumatic diseases, the same children he hopes to help with his research. Three of his current projects investigate: 1) what are the top priorities of children with arthritis and their parents in dealing with arthritis, and how to foretell what a given child can expect from the disease; 2) how physical activity impacts arthritis in children; and 3) whether mobile technologies can help document the impact of arthritis and its treatment on the day-to-day lives of children.

    Current Projects

    What matters the most for parents, patients and clinicians in predicting the course of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? 

    Some children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have a mild disease course that requires little treatment, and others have a severe disease course that requires aggressive treatment despite its attendant toxic effects. However, our ability to predict who will have a severe disease course is limited, and parents and patients have not been systematically consulted about their priorities in defining the course and outcomes of JIA. With funding from the Canadian Initiative for Outcomes in Rheumatology Care (CIORA) we are conducting focus groups and reciprocal interviews (participants interview each other) to gather the opinions of parents, patients and clinicians about the clinical features that should be used to define the course and outcomes of JIA, the terms that should be used to describe JIA disease course, and the desirable attributes of a tool to predict the course of JIA.

    CIHR Team in Linking Exercise, Physical Activity and Pathophysiology in Childhood Arthritis: A Canadian Collaborative Team (LEAP).

    Identifying, characterizing and understanding the relationship of physical activity with arthritis signs and symptoms and the development of bone and muscle in children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) will provide the evidence required to rationally incorporate Physical Activity into the care of children with JIA.  This cross-Canada study funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research will define what determines the level of physical activity in children with arthritis, and how the level of physical activity impacts the symptoms and signs of the disease, blood markers of inflammation and the development of joints, bones and muscle.

    Measuring What Counts: Documenting the Impact of Arthritis on Children's Daily Community Activities.

    Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) are less active and less involved in community activities than their healthy peers. Children and families who attend the arthritis clinic say what "counts" for them is how much JIA interferes with the child's ability to participate in family, peer and community activities. Currently, this is assessed by informal conversations or standard questionnaires; but these reflect poorly on changes induced by disease of treatment. Our goal is to develop a better method to measure how JIA treatments impact the child's physical activity and community participation. In this study children with JIA wear an accelerometer and a smartphone attached to an elastic belt for one week before and one week after a treatment. The phone and accelerometer use special software to document how treatment impacted mobility and their ability to participate in activities at home and school.

    Selected Publications

    Guzman J, Oen K, Huber AM, et al for the ReACCh-Out investigators. The Risk and Nature of Flares in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Results from the ReACCh-Out cohort. Accepted for publication. Ann Rheum Dis 2015. PMID: 25985972

    Guzman J, Oen K, Tucker LB, et al for the ReACCh-Out investigators. The Outcomes of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Children Managed with Contemporary Treatments: Results from the ReACCh-Out cohort. Annals Rheum Dis 2014 2014 May 19. pii: annrheumdis-2014-205372. doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-205372. PMID: 24842571

    Guzman J, Gómez-Ramírez O, Jurencak R, Shiff N, Berard R, Duffy C, Oen K, Petty R, Benseler S, Brant R, Tucker L. What Matters Most for Patients, Parents, and Clinicians in the Course of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? A Qualitative Study.  J Rheumatol 2014;41:2260-9. PMID: 25225279

    Houghton K, Guzman J. Evaluation of static and dynamic postural balance in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Pediatr Phys Ther. 2013 Summer;25(2):150-7. PMID: 23542191

    Shiff N, Brant R, Guzman J, Cabral D, Huber A, Miettunen P, Roth JI, Scuccimarri R, Alos N, Atkinson S, Collet JP, Couch R, Cummings E, Dent P, Ellsworth J, Hay J, Houghton K, Jurencak R, Lang B, Larche M, LeBlanc C, Rodd C, St. Cyr C, Stein R, Stephure D, Taback S, Rauch F, Ward L, and the Canadian STOPP Consortium. Glucocorticoid-Related Changes in Body Mass Index among Children and Adolescents with Rheumatic Disease. Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Jan;65(1):113-21. PMID: 22826190

    Grants

    2014
    Guzman J, Loughin T, Berard R, Shiff NJ, Jurencak R, Benseler S, Tucker LB. Predicting disease course in children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.  Funded by the Canadian Initiative for Outcomes in Rheumatology Care (CIORA), Canada.  Eighteen months funding $65,053. Principal Investigator

    2011 

    Guzman J, Benseler S, Berard R, Brant R, Duffy C, Jurencak R, Oen K, Petty R, Shiff N, Tucker L. What matters the most for parents, patients and clinicians in predicting the course of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Funded by the Canadian Initiative for Outcomes in Rheumatology Care (CIORA). One year funding: $54,366. Principal Investigator.

    2010 

    Duffy C, Baxter-Jones ADG, Houghton KM, McKay HA, Oen KG, Rosenberg AM, Roth J, Tucker LB, Ward LM, Yeung RS, Benseler S, Feldman D, Guzmán J, Stringer E. CIHR Team in Linking Exercise, Physical Activity and Pathophysiology in Childhood Arthritis: A Canadian Collaborative Team (LEAP). Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canada.  Five year funding: $2,500,000. Co-investigator

    2009 

    Shiff N, Guzmán J, Kaczorowski J, Tucker L. Barriers to Pediatric Rheumatology Subspecialty Care in British Columbia.  Funded by Canadian Initiative for Outcomes in Rheumatology Care, Canada. One year funding: $48,600. Co-investigator

    Guzmán J, Houghton K, Tucker L. Measuring What Counts: Documenting the Impact of Arthritis on Children’s Daily Community Activities. Funded by British Columbia Children’s Hospital Telethon Foundation, Canada. Three year funding: $29,850. Principal Investigator

    Guzmán J, Tompa E, Keen D, Alamgir H, Koehoorn M. Accounting for all the benefits: How should we judge the worth of occupational health and safety programs in the healthcare sector? Funded by WorkSafeBC, British Columbia, Canada.  Three year funding: $212,976. Principal Investigator 

    Loisel P, Anema JR, Baril R, Breslin C, Bultmann U, Cassidy JD, Cooper JE, Corbière M, Côté P, Coutu MF, Dewa C, Dionne C, Durand MJ, Feuerstein M, Franche RL, Gagnon D, Guzmán J, Hogg-Johnson S, Koehoorn M, Krause N, Lambert C, Lippel K, MacEachen E, Mairiaux P, Pransky G, Ranville P, Shaw W, Tompa E, Vézina N, Scardamalia M.  Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Strategic Training Program in Work Disability Prevention. Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, Canada.  Six year funding: $1,945,002. Co-investigator

    2008 

    Guzmán J, Alamgir H, Tompa E, Koehoorn M, Dhalla S. Documenting the economic and quality of life consequences of work injuries for healthcare workers in BC. Funded by WorkSafeBC, British Columbia, Canada.  Three year funding: $190,832. Principal Investigator

    Franche RL, Cote J, Guzmán J, Koehoorn M, Mustard C, Ibrahim S, Smith P. Multimorbidity, Depression and pain in the workplace: Potential Risk factors for Work Absence and Work Limitations in Canadian Nurses. Funded by Workplace Safety and Insurance Board, Ontario, Canada.  Two year funding: $120,638. Co-investigator

    Honours & Awards

    2014: Kourir Gold Medal Award at the 2014 congress of the Pediatric Rheumatology European Society

    2010: Duncan Murray Award for Excellence in Teaching. Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of British Columbia

    2010: Martin M. Hoffman award for Excellence in Research. Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia.

    Research Group Members
    • Angelyne Sarmiento
    • Kevin Huang
    • Omar Sadek
    • Stephanie Wong
    • Jeremy Parr
    • Henrie de Boer
    • Aybaniz Ibrahimova