Discovery Talks are the research community's international seminar series. Featuring influential research leaders from around the globe, the series promotes knowledge exchange, fosters international collaborations and showcases the latest innovations in research.
 
The Healthy Starts Theme at BC Children's Hospital presents:

   

Integration of Genetic, Epigenetic, and Environmental Information in
Autism Spectrum Disorder
 




Dr. M. Daniele Fallin, PhD  
Sylvia and Harold Halpert Professor and Chair, Department of Mental Health; Director of the Wendy Klag Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Learning objectives:

  • Gain knowledge about the recent advances in epidemiology of autism spectrum disorder
  • Understand the value of integrating genetic and epigenetic data to understand autism spectrum disorder
  • Identify the challenges and next steps for autism epidemiology and genetic epidemiology
   

Schedule

The seminar is scheduled for Tuesday, September 18, 2018, 3 - 4 p.m. at the Chan Centre for Family Health Education, BC Children's Hospital Research Institute (Map). Refreshments will follow in the Chieng Family Atrium. 

Please RSVP here.

Participate

Discovery Talks is accredited as a self-approved group learning activity (Section 1) as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. CME credits are available for all participants.

About the Speaker

Dr. M. Daniele (Dani) Fallin, PhD, is the Sylvia and Harold Halpert Professor and Chair of the Department of Mental Health and the Director of the Wendy Klag Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She also holds joint appointments in the School’s Epidemiology and Biostatistics Departments, as well as in the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine’s Departments of Medicine and Psychiatry.

Dr. Fallin earned a PhD in Genetic Epidemiology at Case Western Reserve University before coming to Johns Hopkins as an Assistant Professor in Epidemiology in 2001. She has served as a standing member of two epidemiology-focused NIH study sections, including current membership of NAME, and is a past Special Editor for Genetics for the Journal of Epidemiology.

Her research group studies how environments, behaviours, genetic variation, and epigenetic variation contribute to risk for psychiatric disease, particularly autism. She is the Principal Investigator of the Maryland site of the Study to Explore Early Development (SEED), a multi-site case-control study of autism genetic and environmental risk factors, and the Early Autism Research Longitudinal Investigation (EARLI) study, a prospective pregnancy cohort focused on causes of autism. She has further led GWAS and EWAS studies based on SEED, EARLI, and other autism samples.



Upcoming Talks

The Brain, Behaviour & Development Theme at BC Children's Hospital presents:


Development of the Emotional Brain



Dr. Nim Tottenham, PhD
Associate Professor of Psychology and Director, Developmental Affective Neuroscience Laboratory, Columbia University

Learning objectives:

  • Consider how early social environments shape brain development
  • Understand the neurobiology of emotional process across development
  • Consider how developmental timing of events matter for outcomes

          Schedule

          The seminar is scheduled for Friday, October 5, 2018, 10 - 11 a.m. at the Chan Centre for Family Health Education, BC Children's Hospital Research Institute (Map). Refreshments will follow in the Chieng Family Atrium. 

          To RSVP, please email BB&D@bcchr.ca.

          Participate

          Discovery Talks is accredited as a self-approved group learning activity (Section 1) as defined by the Maintenance of Certification program of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. CME credits are available for all participants.

          About the Speaker

          Dr. Nim Tottenham, PhD is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Director of the Developmental Affective Neuroscience Laboratory at Columbia University. 

          Dr. Tottenham's research examines brain development underlying emotional behaviour in humans. Her research has highlighted fundamental changes in brain circuitry across development and the powerful role that early experiences, such as caregiving and stress, have on the construction of these circuits. She has also authored over 80 journal articles and book chapters.

          Dr. Tottenham is a frequent lecturer both nationally and internationally on human brain and emotional development, and is a recipient of the National Institute of Mental Health: Biobehavioral Research Award for Innovative New Scientists (BRAINS), the American Psychological Association’s Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology, and the Developmental Science Early Career Researcher Prize.


          Video recordings of previous lectures are available online: Video Library. These may be useful for classes, or of interest to those who are unable to attend events. 

          For more information, contact please comm@bcchr.ca.